What Comes After the Pandemic: Implications for Markets and Portfolios

In this new webcast, Franklin Templeton CIOs Ed Perks and Manraj Sekhon discuss the twelve month outlook for the global economy.

    Edward D. Perks, CFA

    Edward D. Perks, CFA Chief Investment Officer, Franklin Templeton MultiAsset Solutions

    Manraj Sekhon

    Manraj Sekhon Chief Investment Officer, Franklin Templeton Emerging Market Equities

    It’s no understatement to say that markets have undergone some wild gyrations over the past few weeks. What started as a seemingly limited outbreak of a virus in Wuhan China has become a global pandemic, and with it we’ve seen significant volatility around the world.

    In this webcast, Chief Investment Officers Ed Perks, Franklin Templeton Multi-Asset Solutions, and Manraj Sekhon, Franklin Templeton Emerging Market equities, discuss growth implications for China, as well as global policy responses and options, implications for corporate earnings and balance sheet health, and most importantly, longer term opportunities and risks that should inform today’s portfolios.

    WHAT ARE THE RISKS?

    All investments involve risks, including possible loss of principal. Bond prices generally move in the opposite direction of interest rates. Thus, as prices of bonds in an investment portfolio adjust to a rise in interest rates, the value of the portfolio may decline. Investments in foreign securities involve special risks including currency fluctuations, economic instability and political developments. Special risks are associated with foreign investing, including currency fluctuations, economic instability and political developments; investments in emerging markets involve heightened risks related to the same factors. Investments in emerging markets involve heightened risks related to the same factors, in addition to those associated with these markets’ smaller size, lesser liquidity and lack of established legal, political, business and social frameworks to support securities markets. Actively managed strategies could experience losses if the investment manager’s judgment about markets, interest rates or the attractiveness, relative values, liquidity or potential appreciation of particular investments made for a portfolio, proves to be incorrect. There can be no guarantee that an investment manager’s investment techniques or decisions will produce the desired results.